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Archive for the ‘Brilliant work’ Category

The new ID-ology is at www.IDbranding.com/idology

We’re relocating our blog to www.IDbranding.com/idology and we’ve made some great new improvements that allow our readers a better glimpse at who we are and what exactly our agency has to contribute to this whole branding thing. Our entire archive of articles has been migrated to the new site–so don’t worry about losing any of our classic posts, its all there waiting for you. Thanks for listening, learning, and contributing, we’ll see you at the new ID-ology!

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You’ve got to see the greatest Flash into in the history of web design. Unskippable. Unbelievable. It elicits involuntary and unprintable exclamations.

– Doug

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A friend of ours (and I mean that in a Donny Brasco sort of way), Jeff Faulkner, brought this to my attention via Facebook, and I figure we could all use some of this.

Thanks, Jefe.

– Doug

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And delivered big time.

jobcuzzi

The jobcuzzi, the most relaxing job interview in the world.

Mr. Ian “I am the most unobnoxious person in advertising” Cohen showed some incredibly inspiring stuff at the Portland Advertising Federation lunch talk today. He’s a founder of Wexley School for Girls, and their work included a recruiting campaign for Microsoft that made me feel like the world is a good place after all. Who would ever expect a recruiting campaign do that?

It’s not just the work that made me feel that way, but the fact that Microsoft approved work like that. More evidence that our large friends to the north are willing to show their soul. (And have one.)

I must certainly add Wexley to the list of agencies reinventing the agency. They started out to do that 5 years ago and, honestly, I just hadn’t seen their work presented with stories wrapped around it or I would have understood this long ago. Bully for you, girlies.

Today’s presentation, along with day before yesterday’s election, proves that hope springs eternal in the hearts of humans despite the multitude of crushingly hopeless moments that rain down upon our heads like stunned birds.

Thanks, Wexley. That felt good.

– Doug

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Don’t let me be the last person to find out about this bizarre and lovely show. And don’t you be the last, either. Matt here at the office told me about it. Another reason to love Matt.

Dexter is a really sweet serial killer who is a blood splatter expert on the Miami Dade Police Force. Mmmmm…serial.

It’s on Showtime. Sorry, another reason to have cable.

– Doug

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Sorry, Barbara Lippert of Adweek, but your somewhat simplistic review of the first two “teaser” spots for Microsoft, the ones with Bill Gates and Jerry Seinfeld, is just wrong.

You are far more functional in your assessment of an ad than the general public is. A good portion of the public loves to scratch its head – witness the success of ABC’s Lost. People are capable of handling a lot more ambiguity than they’re given credit for. The general public is looking for things that catch their attention, surprise them, and maybe even puzzle the hell out of them on a rational level, as long as there’s some emotional connection and interest. On the other hand, you already know this, so I’m sorry if I sound patronizing.

A good example: imagine if Burger King had pulled the freaky plastic-faced King spot when people started scratching their heads over it, instead of letting the campaign play itself out. A great turn-around might have been sadly averted.

But you’re dead on with your assessment of the I’m A PC spot. Brilliant and perfect. On the other hand, it’s a more obvious brilliance than the two teasers. As Dan Wieden once said (and I paraphrase), real innovation doesn’t make you say “Yeah, great!” It makes you say, “Huh?”

Of course the beauty of the human condition is that there are multiple readings of any one thing. I just happen to disagree with yours. Yet your opinion of the teasers reinforces their “Huh?” factor, which I don’t think is a bad thing at all. I live for “Huh?” moments, and so do a lot of other people.

– Doug

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